Chicken and spring vegetable pasta

If you can't get to a local farmers' market on a regular basis, consider signing up for a consumer supported agriculture food box/bag. Local small farms with a wide array of crops bring the very freshest, most nutritious, and tastiest fruits and vegetables directly to your neighborhood and sometimes even to your home by subscription. You get the best food there is for you and your children, and the farmers get a regular income—everyone wins. Most local CSAs in Northern California offer organic produce, so they are caring for the planet also by avoiding pesticides and pollution. Check out the Web sites fullbellyfarm.com, riverdogfarm.com, and terrafirmafarm.com to get an idea how CSAs work and what they have to offer. Meanwhile, back at the market you will find all kinds of interesting little things with bulbous ends. In addition to the usual scallions and leeks, you will find spring onions and spring garlic. These tender, mild, yet-to-be-fully-differentiated-into-their-adult-version vegetables were the stars in tasty pasta.

Servings: 2-4

Ingredients

  • 1 boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into small, bite-size pieces
  • 1 bunch spring onions, light red, white, and light green parts thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch spring garlic, white and light green parts thinly sliced
  • 2 regular cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 small leeks, white parts thinly sliced
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth or white wine
  • 8 ounces whole wheat linguine
  • Small handful fresh parsley, chopped
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Cook the pasta per instructions and drain. Meanwhile, sauté the onions, garlic, and leeks in the olive oil until fragrant and soft. Remove from pan and set aside. Sauté the chicken until cooked through. Add the vegetables back to the pan with some chicken broth. Toss in the pasta and warm through. Season to taste and toss in the parsley for flavor and color. This makes a very simple, quick meal with flavors unique to this season.

Nutrition Information (per serving)

Contributor

Preston Maring, MD